Top 7 Best Digital Pianos For Classical Players

The whole idea behind digital pianos is quite simple. These instruments were designed to allow you to experience and enjoy the sound of an acoustic piano without having to pay the full price of one. Ever since digital pianos became a thing, people wondered whether a professional classical player can get the performance they need from one of these instruments? Today we are going to show you our top picks for top 7 best digital pianos for classical players. Some of these are easily among the best digital pianos in general. Afterward, we'll look into this category a bit deeper.

Top 7 Best Digital Pianos For Classical Players

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AR RATING 99/100

  • One of the best looking upright models out there.
  • Features one of the best weighted actions available.

AR RATING 95/100

  • One of the best Casio models on the market.
  • Features a good weighted hammer action and pretty authentic keys.

AR RATING 94/100

  • One of Yamaha’s best proven digital pianos.
  • Comes packed with an awesome sound engine.

AR RATING 94/100

  • Comes with a set of simulated ivory and ebony keys.
  • Features Casio’s weighted hammer action which is proven.

AR RATING 93/100

  • One of the best bang for the buck options.
  • Comes with GHS weighted keyboard as standard.

AR RATING 88/100

  • A full sized upright digital piano on a budget.
  • Comes with a crude but workable weighted action.

AR RATING 88/100

  • A full sized upright digital piano on a budget.
  • Comes with a crude but workable weighted action.

AR RATING 99/100

Yamaha’s top tier digital pianos are a thing of beauty. They not only feature the latest software and hardware solutions, but they look the part as well. Yamaha Arius YDP-181 is by all means on of the best top tier digital pianos you can find at the moment. It’s full of awesome stuff which definitely cater to the classical player.

This particular model comes in a very attractive cabinet, features Yamaha’s Graded Hammer weighted action keyboard, comes with all three pedals and more. The keys feel authentic and true to form, which pretty much goes for the entire piano. The software is among the best and it comes with Dynamic Stereo Sampling AWM piano. This is just scratching the surface.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the best looking upright models out there.
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    Features one of the best weighted actions available.
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    Comes packed with awesome samples and a capable sound engine.
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    Comes with cool accessories which complete the experience.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Not the most affordable model out there for sure.

AR RATING 95/100

Casio is right up there with Yamaha when it comes to advanced digital pianos. With that said, they also know how to deliver a package that is catered towards classical players who expect excellence. Casio PX870 Privia is a proven package that many find to be the sweet spot in terms of price and performance. It offers plenty of features.

For starters you get Casio’s weighted hammer action that features simulated ebony and ivory. In short the sensation of playing this piano is pretty much on par with any acoustic model out there. The sound engine is packed with awesome piano samples and delivers great range of sound. With four speakers built into it, you get great volume as well.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the best Casio models on the market.
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    Features a good weighted hammer action and pretty authentic keys.
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    The sound engine Casio has chosen definitely packs range.
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    A pretty versatile package in terms of I/O.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Doesn’t come with basic accessories which is kinda expected.

AR RATING 94/100

As you’re about to find out, Yamaha is definitely well represented in this segment of the market. We have shown you some of their flagship models from the top tier category, but now we’d like to show you what Yamaha offers in the upper mid range. Yamaha P125B belongs to a well proven family of digital pianos you can trust.

The piano features all the right hardware and software. We are talking their GHS weighted action with good quality keys, Pure CF sound engine that is loaded with Yamaha 9’ CFIIIS concert grand piano samples and a full suite of other tools. Overall, it’s good to go for classical players but also those who need that extra functionality in there.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of Yamaha’s best proven digital pianos.
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    Comes packed with an awesome sound engine.
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    Features their GHS weighted action.
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    Features a good set of accessories.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    The base feel a bit crude but is ultimately decent.

AR RATING 94/100

Following the Privia line of pianos we run into another awesome model. This time around it is the Casio Privia PX-770. It is fairly similar to the other Privia we have mentioned above, but it is definitely one tier lower in the grand scheme of things. Even so, it’s still one of the best options for classical players out there.

When it comes to hardware and software, this piano is rock solid. In other words, you are getting a Casio’s weighted hammer action that features those same simulated ebony and ivory keys. The sound engine is the same although the samples are a bit different. Overall, you are getting a package similar to one we’ve shown you, but definitely cheaper.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    Comes with a set of simulated ivory and ebony keys.
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    Features Casio’s weighted hammer action which is proven.
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    Loaded with a good sound engine and great piano samples.
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    Packed with awesome accessories and learning tools.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    The seat that comes with it is mediocre at best.

AR RATING 93/100

Next comes another Yamaha which marks our entry into the mid and lower mid range of the market. This is where you’ll find models which are still suitable for classical players, but which also require you to make a compromise or two. With Yamaha P-115, that compromise comes in form of pedals. Aside from that, it’s a rock solid performer.

Yamaha ships these with a graded hammer action keyboard, which offers a surprisingly good feedback for the money. If you are used to traditional keys and actions, this one will still feel pretty good. On top of that you also get that famous Pure CF sound engine with Yamaha 9’ CFIIIS concert grand piano samples. Overall, it’s a great package.

WHAT WE LIKE

  • check
    One of the best bang for the buck options.
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    Comes with GHS weighted keyboard as standard.
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    Features Yamaha’s Pure CF sound engine.
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    Comes loaded with Yamaha 9’ CFIIIS concert grand piano samples.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Fairly crude in terms of aesthetics.

AR RATING 88/100

Moving further down the line we run into Lagrima LG-8830. This piano doesn’t have a pedigree like the models we have discussed up until now. However, it does offer something they don’t. It’s a very affordable digital piano that brings all the core features and then some. Are there tradeoffs? Absolutely, but the stuff that matters the most is there.

What you’re getting with this package is a basic weighted action that is more about providing raw resistance than anything else. From a classical pianist’s point of view, that’s a decent solution on a budget. Speaking of decent solutions, this piano comes with all three pedals and a capable sound engine. Naturally the samples aren’t as refined, but they work.

WHAT WE LIKE

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     full sized upright digital piano on a budget.
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    Comes with a crude but workable weighted action.
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    Features all three pedals as standard.
  • check
    Comes with a capable sound engine.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    The piano samples aren’t the best on this model.

AR RATING 88/100

Last model we would like to show you also comes from Yamaha and represents one of their budget oriented solutions. Yamaha P45 may not fit the usual picture of a classical pianist’s dream, but if you need a good package that will work on a budget, this is definitely one that’s worth looking into. All you need is a stand.

The piano itself is quite interesting. It comes with a sustain pedal, a weighted action and true to size piano keys. The overall sensation of playing this thing is decent. The sound engine is a simple one but it’s loaded with a good sample library. You are getting good quality of sound at a pretty bargain price. That’s pretty awesome.

WHAT WE LIKE

  • check
    One of the most affordable models suitable for classical players.
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    Comes with a sustain pedal.
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    Features a weighted action with full sized keys.
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    Features a good sound engine with good samples.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    It requires you to get a stand or a base.

Can Digital Pianos Meet The Basic Needs Of Classical Players? 

The short answer is 'depends'. If you think about it, classical music pretty much evolved with the piano as an instrument. The two are more or less a part of the same organism and always have been. What does this mean for our our discussion? It means that you will need a digital piano that features all of the goodies you would find on a suitable acoustic piano. The only issue here is that models that fit this description aren't exactly affordable. Most of these are going to be digital pianos from the $1000 price range.

That much is obvious just by looking at our list and keep in mind that we did our best to keep this list as attainable as possible for most folks out there. Although technically correct, this explanation isn't really suitable for wide masses. Because of that we are going to look into individual features that a digital piano is going to need for it to be suitable for classical players. Once we cover all of them, you should have a pretty good idea of which models on the market are suitable for this application and which you should definitely stay away from. Without further ado, lets get started.

Weighted Action 

One of the very basic and primary features you need to have on a digital piano for it to be considered suitable for classical players is a weighted action. There is no way around it. Action of a digital piano is what separates it from a simple keyboard. Without a complex weighted action, you can't reach the same level of expression nor can you exert the same type of control over your instrument. Digital pianos with weighted actions are by far the only segment of this market which is suitable for classical players. When it comes to specific actions, more refined and advanced is better. It's pretty simple if you think about it.

Piano Design 

The design of the piano itself is also quite important from the perspective of this guide. Even though it would be silly to expect the form factor of a grand concert piano from a digital model, you definitely want to get the basics down. By basics we mean an upright setup, preferably with a wooden base that also has fixed pedals. Notes stand is also something many find important as well. At the end of the day it all comes down to maintaining that same posture and economy of motion whether you're playing a digital piano or an elite grand concert model.

Samples and Presets 

Finally we get to sound engines and samples. Not so long ago digital pianos were considered to be a gimmick by most professional pianists. The sound quality of those early models was crude and quite laughable compared to even the cheapest acoustic piano. As things usually go with digital technologies, it was only a matter of time before the quality of sound reached the same or very, very similar level of an actual acoustic model. Some will argue that digital pianos simply can't sound as good as an acoustic ones, but that is up for discussion. From a purely objective point of view, some digital models are simply amazing.

The models we have listed above generally feature some of the best sound engines available on the market. For example, Casio and Yamaha both pack their models with impressive samples recorded using meticulous techniques. Once complied and pushed through their respective sound engines, you are getting a sound that is about as authentic as they come these days. That is unless you want to spend a car's worth of money on a digital piano.

Conclusion 

Classical pianists are definitely among the hardest segment of the community to satisfy when it comes to digital pianos. That is just how things are. Even so, we have shown you just what kind of performance, designs and sound you can expect to find if you belong to this category of pianists. As it turns out, you can get quite a lot. The models listed above are absolutely some of the best your money can buy. We have spread out our picks over a wide price range, thus giving everyone a chance to find something that suits their specific budget.

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