15 Best Acoustic And Classical Guitars For Beginners – Start Your Journey With Style!

Have you stood on the outside of the music store looking in, either literally or figuratively? You want a top quality guitar, but you’re not sure which one to buy. You’ve come to the right place. We’re going to answer your questions, even the ones you didn’t know you had. A guitar isn’t just a couple pieces of wood attached together with some strings stretched across it. It is a complex combination of materials and techniques to create an instrument that is as much art as it is a creator of art.

We’ve collected data on many models, rated them, and even have done extended reviews of the guitars. You can look at the comparison table below then delve deeper with the links to the reviews. There is an in-depth guide with tips and tricks to finding the right guitar for you after the table.

Top 15 Best Acoustic Guitars For Beginners

PRODUCT

FEATURES

PRODUCT

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PRODUCT

FEATURES

AR RATING 62/100

  • Great build quality which Yamaha is know for.
  • Impressive finish as well as binding for this price range.

AR RATING 60/100

  • A timeless dreadnought body which is made using good materials.
  • Good build quality all around.

AR RATING 60/100

  • A simple, little bit rugged but definitely reliable guitar.
  • Good choice of tonewood considering the price.

AR RATING 60/100

  • One of the more stylish beginner models on the market.
  • Good build quality making it a guitar built to last.

AR RATING 60/100

  • One of the best value for the money offers out there.
  • Good build quality for the price.
  • One of the more hidden Gibson licensed gems.
  • Great vintage design which looks just amazing.

AR RATING 59/100

  • One of the best value kits on the market.
  • A well built dreadnought with a rich tone.

AR RATING 58/100

  • One of the simplest yet most well rounded beginner models.
  • Comes with a great set of accessories to get you started.

AR RATING 58/100

  • A full blooded FG model that brings all the benefits.
  • Great build quality and ergonomics all around.

AR RATING 58/100

  • One of the most affordable dreadnought out there.
  • Good build quality all around.

AR RATING 63/100

  • Classic design and finish give it a vintage vibe.
  • Cordoba's legendary build quality extends to this guitar as well.

AR RATING 62/100

  • Robust yet fine tuned body that features good build quality.
  • Great sound that really fills the space.

AR RATING 61/100

  • A simple yet proven design that just works.
  • Great choice of tonewood for such an affordable build.

AR RATING 61/100

  • One truly affordable beginner model that delivers.
  • Great performance and sound for this price range.
  • One of the most affordable guitars worth getting.
  • Decent sound that has enough color to it.

PRODUCT

FEATURES

PRODUCT

AR RATING 62/100

Yamaha is by far one of the most trusted brands when it comes to acoustic guitars. Where most elite brands take pride in their luthiers who do everything by hand, Yamaha takes pride in their ability to mass produce extremely high quality guitars. Yamaha APXT2 is a perfect example of what we mean. This acoustic guitar just takes it further.

What we have is a 3/4 scale jumbo style body that features a spruce top combined with Meranti back and sides. Being a bit smaller makes it a great starter for kids or those of smaller stature. Best of all, it's actually an acoustic electric model, which means you can plug it into an amp should you want to.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    Great build quality which Yamaha is know for.
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    Impressive finish as well as binding for this price range.
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    Comes with a built in preamp making it quite functional.
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    Sounds massive and rich all things considered.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    The strings that come with this guitar are mediocre.

AR RATING 60/100

Jasmine is another brand that commands respect in the world of acoustic guitars. Because of that, many beginners are choosing them as their go to source of beginner guitars. Jasmine S35 is a great way to start your journey. This guitar features all the right goodies in all the right places, plus it comes with a bunch of great accessories.

S35 is a full size dreadnought that is made of agathis, and features a nice spruce top. Overall, it is very easy to play. Jasmine ships these with a gig bag, a nice clip-on tuner, a set of Dunlop picks and a pack of Martin strings. For those who are just starting out, this package is pretty great everything considered.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    A timeless dreadnought body which is made using good materials.
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    Good build quality all around.
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    Comes packed with awesome accessories.
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    Sounds good out of the box.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    You might need to do a proper setup job.

AR RATING 60/100

Every category of musical instruments has that one model which is the go to beginner setup. For acoustic guitars, that model is the Fender FA-100. Is it the best possible option? Not really, but it is familiar and reliable enough where it is deemed to be a safe bet. Overall this sentiment is rooted in facts and reality for sure.

Looking over the FA-100, it is a standard dreadnought that features decent tonewood all around. The build quality is somewhat rugged but ultimately good enough. FA-100 isn't the best looking or most refined kid on the block but it will get you started down the right path. Because of that, it deserves the title of a classic beginner acoustic guitar.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    A simple, little bit rugged but definitely reliable guitar.
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    Good choice of tonewood considering the price.
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    Decent dreadnought sound, volume and color.
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    Decent hardware and strings.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    These sometimes need a setup job out of the box.

AR RATING 60/100

It is no secret that Ibanez is one of the hottest brands when it comes to building good, beginner friendly guitars. Their acoustic program includes some pretty awesome gems such as the Ibanez IJV30. This guitar represents what you can get if you are willing to pitch in a bit more money for your first guitar. It is still affordable.

However, it pushes that style bar a bit higher. Ibanez went with a solid spruce top paired with agathis back and sides. Build quality is pretty good which shows when you put this thing through its paces. Both the performance of the hardware and tonewood is consistent. This in turn yields consistent sound and that is definitely what you want.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the more stylish beginner models on the market.
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    Good build quality making it a guitar built to last.
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    Sound that is reminiscent of a much more expensive dreadnought.
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    Comes with a great set of accessories.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    The strings that come with the guitar need a change.

AR RATING 60/100

Rogue is a brand many haven't even heard of. However, they do make some pretty decent beginner acoustic guitars. Their Rogue RA-090 is easily keeping up with the pack. We would go as far as to say that it's among the leading models in its respective price range. As such it really deserves some recognition. It's not easy for sure.

From a technical point of view, this a fairly standard dreadnought. The shape is there as well as the depth and timbre you would expect to get. Rogue went with a whitewood body, which isn't really traditional, but has proven to be quite a decent solution. Then you have a great nato neck that is fairly comfortable and much more.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the best value for the money offers out there.
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    Good build quality for the price.
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    Great sound with a slightly unique flavor.
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    Pretty decent hardware all things considered.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Those factory strings are pretty terrible.

AR RATING 59/100

You've probably lived your life so far thinking that Epiphone is the only brand that does affordable, licensed Gibson copies? This guitar proves that is not true. Maestro By Gibson is a pretty simple dreadnought that's designed to capture that vintage Gibson vibe. When you really take a closer look, it sure looks quite promising with all of its details.

For starters you get a nice, smooth honey burst finish which gives the whole guitar a very refined appearance. Good looks are not all it has to offer though. Maestro has used a spruce laminate along with kauri back and sides to give this guitar a fairly good sound. Combined with a standard dreadnought body, it really sings out loud.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the more hidden Gibson licensed gems.
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    Great vintage design which looks just amazing.
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    Good build quality all around.
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    A decent sound which has a lot of depth.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Laminate top wouldn't be our top choice but it works.

AR RATING 59/100

Getting a value pack as your first guitar is a pretty solid way of getting all of your bases covered. Donner DAG-1C has proven to be one of the better value kits currently on the market. Not only is the guitar itself quite decent, but you get so many cool accessories which make the whole package too good to ignore.

The guitar is a full size dreadnought with a cutaway. It's made of decent wood that gives it a fairly good sound overall. Inside the box you will find a padded gig bag, a clip on tune, pack of picks, backup strings and even a capo. If you're starting out and you're on a very limited budget, check this out.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the best value kits on the market.
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    A well built dreadnought with a rich tone.
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    Great selection of accessories allow you to start right away.
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    Pretty good warranty on the whole deal.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    The strings that come with the guitar need changing.

AR RATING 58/100

Considering that Squier covers most of Fenders classic electric models, it comes as no surprise that they also make a line of acoustic guitars. Squier By Fender SA-150 is a great dreadnought for beginners, which features an all black finish and a pretty sweet looking rosette. If this doesn't sound like much, know that they've taken it from Fender's playbook.

If looks aren't too important to you, this will be a very good guitar for you. The sound is there and so is projection. The tonewood is decent and does a good job at maintaining consistency. On top of all that, Squier ships these with a gig bag, a set of picks, spare strings and a strap, all Fender merch.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the simplest yet most well rounded beginner models.
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    Comes with a great set of accessories to get you started.
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    Great build quality across the board.
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    A good, balanced sound with plenty of volume.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    You might want to do a proper setup on it.

AR RATING 58/100

FG series from Yamaha really need very little introduction. This is the most popular and best selling line of acoustic guitars in history. The Yamaha JR1 FG Junior is one of the most affordable FGs, aimed at beginners. This is a 3/4 guitar, making it perfect for kids and those of smaller stature. After all, comfort is absolutely paramount.

The guitar features a proper spruce top paired with laminate back and sides. This is where Yamaha's world renowned mass production process comes in handy. When you pick this thing up, you will hardly find a flaw. Many wonder just what kind of sound you can get from a 3/4 dreadnought. Rest easy knowing that this guitar sounds amazing.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    A full blooded FG model that brings all the benefits.
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    Great build quality and ergonomics all around.
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    Impressive sound for the money.
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    Perfect for kids and those with smaller hands.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Once again the strings are the weakest link.

AR RATING 53/100

Looking at so called 'no name' models, you might be convinced that there is nothing to see. You'd be wrong. There are guitars such as the Afuaim's Dreadnought, which are well worth checking out. Truth be told this guitar is pretty strange we put against more common models. It is a dreadnought that features a spruce top and nanyang shell.

Even though nangyang isn't the most common tonewood of choice, it ended up working out just fine. Tone is there and so is the volume. In terms of build quality, this guitar is pretty decent. Considering the price tag on one of these, you're looking at a fairly attractive bargain. Add a gig bag and the whole thing sounds great.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the most affordable dreadnought out there.
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    Good build quality all around.
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    Sounds like a proper dreadnought with plenty of volume.
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    Comes with a padded gig bag.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Nangyang laminate wouldn't be our first choice but it works.

AR RATING 63/100

Cordoba's classical guitars are a thing of beauty. This brand is a rare one that really invest into the entry level and mid range classical models. Cordoba C3M is an impressive piece for any beginner. The guitar features a solid cedar top paired with mahogany back and sides. By using mahogany Cordoba has infused a lot of power into C3M.

The shape is a classic Spanish one, making it very comfortable for every day playing. As a matter of fact, the entire guitar looks well optimized and well built. At this price range, you'll hardly find anything that is going to blow the C3M straight out of the water. Chances are you won't find anything as good. It's that great.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    Classic design and finish give it a vintage vibe.
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    Cordoba's legendary build quality extends to this guitar as well.
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    Sound that is rich, loud but well balanced.
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    A great neck that is comfortable enough for novices.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Might need a setup upon arrival.

AR RATING 62/100

Ibanez classical guitars are among the best on the market. Despite their more aggressive reputation, Ibanez is no stranger to a quality classical tone. When it comes to beginner models in their offer, Ibanez GA3 tends to stand out the most. This guitar is interesting because of its great build quality, good fit and finish and the level of detail.

Ibanez GA3 features a spruce top paired with agathis back and sides. This is a fairly common combo for this segment of the market and classical guitars in general. As a result, it sound full with a great range and plenty of volume. If that wasn't enough, keep in mind that consistency's the key with classic guitars. Ibanez offers that.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    Robust yet fine tuned body that features good build quality. 
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    Great sound that really fills the space.
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    Good choice of materials by Ibanez.
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    One of the best starters out there.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    This guitar benefits greatly from a decent set of strings.

AR RATING 61/100

Yamaha's C series of classical guitars are somewhat reminiscent to the legendary FG lineup. Even though they are not as popular, you are getting that very same universal strain of pure quality. Yamaha C40II( is a great example of what a proper classical guitar should look, feel and sound like. It's one of the more affordable, legit starter classical guitars

Sound wise, you are getting exactly what you could hope to get. With a spruce top and merant back and sides, C40II is following the canon sonic profile. However, where this guitar stands apart are the details. It's the little things that give it a clear edge. If you are on a very tight budget, this is what you need.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    A simple yet proven design that just works.
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    Great choice of tonewood for such an affordable build.
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    Playable and great sounding package.
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    It's an easy guitar to live with.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    A set of strings and a setup will do wonders.

AR RATING 61/100

Being on a tight budget when you are just starting out can be a pain. However, there are brands out there which are optimized for such cases. Protege By Cordoba C100M represents what you can find. Built by Protege under Cordoba's watchful eye, this guitar is very close to what Cordoba usually offers. The style and details are definitely there.

In terms of sound and performance, this thing is a blast. The sound is wide, rich and pretty warm thanks to its spruce top. With that said, there is plenty of projection and volume to go around, courtesy of a mahogany shell. Last but not least, they ship this guitar with a padded gig bag and a clip on tuner.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One truly affordable beginner model that delivers.
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    Great performance and sound for this price range.
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    Good build quality all around.
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    Comes with a decent set of accessories.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Could use a setup from factory.

AR RATING 55/100

Affordable means has a different meaning for different people. If you are looking for the absolute cheapest decent classical guitar, something like ADM Full Size Nylon-String Classical Guitar is going to be your last resort. This instrument is actually surprisingly decent for the money. You can't really compare it with the more established brands but it will get you started.

Build quality is alright, which is surprising. Top push things even further, ADM went for full body binding as well as neck binding. From an aesthetic point of view this guitar is on point. Performance wise, it will get your foot in the door and then some. At this price, you really won't find better. Especially with all the accessories.

WHAT WE LIKE

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    One of the most affordable guitars worth getting.
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    Decent sound that has enough color to it.
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    Good build quality with surprisingly good details.
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    Comes with a bunch of cool accessories.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE

  • minus
    Not something that will keep up with you for long.

The Complete Acoustic Guitar Buying Guide:

First order of business, if you are learning to play classical or flamenco you will need to buy a classical guitar. If you are just looking to learn to play some songs around the campfire you can buy a classical guitar, but most likely you will want a steel string guitar. Needless to say beginner electric guitars have a separated article devoted to them. The genre of music you want to play will lead you to certain instruments just based on their sound. With that out of the way, let’s dive in and learn more about beginner guitars.

This article can quickly just degrade into a list of terms with a diagram showing where they are on the guitar. Every guitar is a unique experience. There are so many different pieces that go together to give each instrument its feel, tone, and look. We’ll delve into these elements first before going into the definitions.

The Feel

I played in a band where the singer had a tendency to bump into me. When she ran into my right arm, it would go flailing ruining my timing. When she ran into my left arm not much happened as I had contact with the instrument. The neck is the part of the guitar that the guitarist has the most contact with to create music. This is where the feel of the instrument comes in. The width of the fretboard, the thickness of the neck, the height of the strings from the fretboard (also called “the action”), the type of finish, the spacing of the frets and the size of the actual frets, all play into the tactile nature of playing guitar.

Whether you’ve learned to play yet or not, you should put your hands on the guitar’s neck. In a beginner instrument this is the most important. If the action is good, then learning to play will be less of a struggle to capture the notes. More time and energy can be used to make those notes musical. Learn what feels good to play, then find the guitar that uses those elements.

The nut width will let you know how wide the fretboard is. The nut is a grooved piece of either plastic, bone, or synthetic material, that is between the headstock and fretboard. The nut can go from a narrow 1.5” (38mm) to over 2” (50.8mm) wide. This may not seem like much, but you will notice the difference (play a standard steel string, then play a classical guitar and you will know what I mean).
Scale length is the distance from the nut to the center of the 12th fret, then double that measurement. The shorter the scale length the smaller the guitar. The smaller the guitar the shorter the distance between each fret. People with smaller fingers will appreciate a shorter scale length while those with larger fingers will want a longer scale length.

The profile is how thick the neck is from the fretboard to the back of the neck. This speaks more to the size of a player’s palm.
A truss rod will make it possible to adjust the neck depending on the weather conditions. Truss rods are made of metal, and can have their tension adjusted to keep the neck as straight as possible. This is a very important feature for maintaining the playability on a guitar. Traditionally, classical style guitars do not have truss rods.

The Tone

If you don’t play this is where you will need a friend to play the instrument for you. I can talk all day about tonewoods and how they affect the sound of the guitar, but that will mean nothing if you can’t hear the difference for yourself. You need to listen to the guitar, and know if that is a sound you like.

Most of the elements of an acoustic guitar have an effect upon its sound. There is a debate on whether the wood that an electric guitar is made out of effects the sound, but no one can deny that on an acoustic the wood matters.

A frustrating bit to think about is that two guitars made of the same wood will sound very different, it depends on the openness and orientation of the grain, the age, curing conditions, and numerous other factors of the wood itself. Construction techniques also have an effect on the sound of the instrument.

The Looks

The look of the guitar is more than aesthetics. It is the shape of the body that drives the timbre and dynamics of the voice of the guitar. A jumbo body is going to give the guitar a big booming voice, while a OOO (said “triple-O”) size body will be a brighter and quieter sound.

The standard acoustic guitar shape is the dreadnought, named after the WWI battleship design. Most manufacturers produce a dreadnought acoustic guitar.

Every manufacturer has their own designs as well, or at least a tweak on a classic. You won’t know which one is really right for you until you try them out. For simple ease of use a smaller framed person is going to feel more comfortable playing a smaller sized instrument. There are designs that are simply scaled down versions of the original. These are nice for young players as a new instrument can be bought as they grow, and it will feel very similar to the guitar they just outgrew. A smaller sized instrument will have a small sound. That is the sacrifice that has to be made to fit the instrument to the size of a smaller player.

Looks are also important, because you want to like the look of your guitar. I had a guitar that I liked very much, but because of the way that it was built it had a large ugly pickguard. In the end I couldn’t stand it anymore and sold it, because no matter what I did it still had that pickguard. It didn’t affect the tone of the instrument, but it affected the way I approached it. Don’t sacrifice tone or feel for looks, but adding to your budget to buy a guitar that is good-looking is money well spent.

What Else Are You Going to Have to Buy

Besides the guitar itself there are other things that are necessary to purchase either with the guitar are soon after.
Most guitars at the beginner’s price point do not come with a case or gig bag. They will protect the guitar from the elements and from getting scratched or dinged. Gig bags are padded and soft-sided. They are fine for taking an instrument locally, such as to practice, a lesson, or to a friend’s house, but do not offer the protection of a case. To start with a gig bag is more than enough protection for your first instrument.

Buy a tuner. Clip-on tuners are relatively inexpensive, and are very useful beyond the learning stage. Believe me, those around you will appreciate you playing in tune.

A music stand is invaluable for learning. A good one will last a long time, and be useful throughout your musical career. Right now on my music stand, there is: a clip-on tuner, a capo, some extra picks, my iPad, some sheet music, and a piece of paper with notes about a song I’m working on. It is so useful to have a place to put all these things. Most importantly it puts the music in your sight line while you’re practicing. You won’t be struggling to see your music or finding it when it comes time to practice.

Picks, buy lots of picks. Get different sizes, made of different material, and different thicknesses. Every once in a while I’ll buy a different pick just to give it a chance, but most of the time I buy the same pick I’ve been buying for years. Once you figure out what you like, buy a bunch of them. Picks are like socks, they are always disappearing.

A new set of strings can change how a guitar feels and plays. Thinner gauged strings will be easier to play at the cost of some depth of sound. Try different types of strings to find which feels best. Depending how much you play they will need to changed regularly.
Eventually you might want to get a guitar stand. It will put your guitar within easy reach, while being safer than just leaning it against the wall.

Tonewoods

An important feature on an acoustic guitar is what kind of wood it is made out of. Entry-level guitars will also be made with less desirable woods, than their expensive counterparts.

Here are some of the common woods used to build acoustic guitars:

  • Cedar- On the rare occasion when a guitar top is not spruce it will be cedar. It has a darker tone than spruce with more warmth and added bass.
  • Mahogany- Used for back and sides, but can also sometimes be used for a top. It has a warm tone, but without the definition of some of the harder woods.
  • Maple- Creates a very bright sound that lacks bass. Flame and quilted maple has a very striking and beautiful look.
  • Nato- A replacement for mahogany. It has a similar look and tonal qualities, but it does not sound as good. You will notice that the more expensive instruments do not use nato. I find it lacks the clarity of mahogany even though it mimics the warmth. It does look very nice.
  • Rosewood- Very commonly used for back and sides. It has good bass response with good articulation of each string.
  • Sapele- Has a more dramatic look as compared to mahogany, and is used as a replacement for it. Sapele is a faster growing tree, so it is more sustainable than mahogany.
  • Spruce- The most commonly used wood for acoustic guitar tops due to its strength, lightness, consistent look, and sound.

Solid vs. Laminate

Laminate guitars are made of several layers of wood pressed together to create the body of the guitar, laminated guitars are dominant in the best cheap acoustic guitars article that we’ve written. A beginner guitar is going to be made of all laminate wood. If you spend a little more you can at least get a solid top instrument, but to be honest I don’t know if that is really necessary at this level.

Laminate construction is cheaper than solid wood construction, which brings down the price of the guitar. A laminate guitar is stronger and will take more of a beating than a solid wood guitar. For younger players this is probably a good feature to think about. Humidity has less of an effect on laminate construction so depending on the environment you live in this can be a good feature.

Laminate does not have to sound bad. It all depends on how it is made. If filler or a substandard wood is used in the middle portion of the laminate, then that can make the guitar sound less than great. There are many very good guitars that have laminate back and sides. It is nearly impossible to tell whether a guitar is laminate or solid wood just by listening to it, but you can tell if you like the sound.

Some Other Terms

As you read through descriptions and reviews of the various models here are some of the terms you’ll run across that you might not know that haven’t already been discussed in this article.

  • Bridge- The transfer point of the vibration of the string into the body of the guitar.
  • Neck Radius- This is the curve of the fretboard. The smaller the number the rounder the fretboard is. Classical guitars have a flat radius.
  • Rosette- decorative design around the soundhole. It can be ornate using abalone inlay down to a simple sticker.
  • Saddle- A shim that is on the bridge that the strings are draped across made of plastic, bone, or synthetic material.
  • Sound Board- The top of the acoustic guitar body.
  • oundhole- The round hole on the top of the instrument. It is the main projection of the sound.

Popular Questions From Beginners

Should I modify my guitar to make it better? It is possible to improve a guitar with modifications, but the real question is it worth it? At this level my answer is no. You won’t add to the resale value no matter what you do. It would be better to save your money to buy a better instrument (for example just go with an acoustic guitar for $500), than to modify a beginner’s instrument.

Should I buy an electric/acoustic for my first guitar? At an entry-level guitar the easy answer is no. There are sacrifices to make an acoustic guitar inexpensive, and by adding a feature that can cost as much as the guitar itself those sacrifices would be too much. Make sure that playing guitar is your thing, then the next one you buy you can get those electronics.

How do I care for my guitar? Do not leave the guitar in a place with extreme temperatures, like in a car during the summer or winter. Wipe down the guitar and strings using a lint free cloth and put it away in a safe place when you are done using it. Keep it out of the reach of small children.

Editorial Conclusion:

That should give you a good start on what to look for in a beginner’s guitar. Maybe you’ve decided that a more advanced model is the right fit for you, don’t worry we have other comparison articles that look at guitars in different price ranges. Subscribe to our newsletter to learn even more, and to stay ahead of the curve. Stop back regularly as we are always adding to the site. Until next time, keep strumming them open chords and practice your melodies.


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The appropriate research can do wonders if done properly. We are here to help you and save your time and money at the same time. In our website you will see our personal recommendations based on our knowledge and extensive research. What we base our rating using the product details and customer feedback.