Top 3 Best Condenser Microphones Under $50: The Underdogs

If you think $50 is way too low of a price for a decent microphone, you’re both correct and very wrong. You’re correct in that you won’t find the best microphones in this category. The less you pay for a mic, the more chance that mic will have glaring blemishes. But you’re incorrect in that, if you do some digging around, you can find some good mics.

But, not to worry, we’ve done the digging for you and have hand-picked the best three microphones under $50

Top 3 Best Condenser Microphones Under $50:

Marantz Professional MPM-1000

4 Stars
  • Marantz Professional MPM-1000 Review – An Attractive Package At An Attractive Price
  • Marantz Professional MPM-1000 Review – An Attractive Package At An Attractive Price
  • Marantz Professional MPM-1000 Review – An Attractive Package At An Attractive Price
  • Performs well with vocals or acoustic guitar.

  • Comes with XLR cable, shock mount, tripod.

  • May have issues after extended use.

The name sounds like a fighter jet -- and it may be the fighter jet of condenser microphones. It’s built in a way that delivers isolated vocals, clear acoustic guitar, or a high-quality recording of any other instrument. It comes with its own shock mount, tripod, and XLR cable, so it comes fully loaded and ready to go.

AudioRumble rating 80/100

Nady CM-88

4 Stars
  • Nady CM-88 Review – Smooth, Inside And Out
  • Nady CM-88 Review – Smooth, Inside And Out
  • Nady CM-88 Review – Smooth, Inside And Out
  • Built as an overhead mic for recording a drum kit.

  • Very affordable.

  • Not much low end.

  • Has electret condenser instead of the better true condenser.

The CM-88 is a decent microphone for overhead recording or other instruments like guitar or piano. Considering the price, this is a good choice for beginners who need good quality audio but need to stay within their budget.

AudioRumble rating 80/100

BEHRINGER C-1

3.95 Stars
  • BEHRINGER C-1 Review – Does It Live Up To The Award-Winning Name?
  • BEHRINGER C-1 Review – Does It Live Up To The Award-Winning Name?
  • BEHRINGER C-1 Review – Does It Live Up To The Award-Winning Name?
  • Large-diaphragm condenser mic with gold-plated balanced XLR connector.

  • Comes with swivel stand mount and transport case.

  • Picks up background noise.

  • Tends to have a short life.

Again, for a $50 microphone, you can’t expect to get quality equal to the equipment at Abbey Road Studios. But this mic could work well for rookie engineers who are looking to save some cash.

AudioRumble rating 79/100

The elephant in the room (it’s the price)

When a recording engineer sees “under $50,” the first thing they do is keep scrolling. They think there’s nothing worth looking at in that price range. But you have to wonder, why would companies keep making microphones for that cheap if they were garbage and had no demand?

Well, they wouldn’t.

So let’s talk about the elephant in the room — the price: yes, it’s cheap for a microphone. Usually, people look for a good mic in the “over $200” category. But despite the price tag, you can find a decent mic after a little detective work (or just by reading this review).

So don’t underestimate this underdog category. We make broad, sweeping statements about a whole sub-group because we haven’t met any individual microphones from that sub-group. Discrimination without information is worse than just discrimination.

Some-trick ponies

Do you know the term “a one-trick pony”? If you call someone that, it means they can really only do one thing well. Like, say, Tom Cruise, who plays the same exact character in every movie.

Well, mics for under $50 are some-trick ponies — they’re built in a way that makes them good at one or two things, but are not as versatile as other mics, like SM58s for example (which would fall in the price range of $100+).

For example, the top recommended mic for under $50, the Marantz Professional MPM-1000, is a good mic, but only for certain things. It shines the brightest when you use it to record vocals (singing or talking), acoustic guitar, or to isolate an instrument and help it stand out from other instruments and noise.

This is how most of the mics in this sub-group perform.

Fit for newbies

Although you might initially think the low price point is a con, it can actually be a big pro for some people: beginners.

If you’re new to recording and are still learning, grabbing a mic for this cheap can be a very good decision. You save money, you keep things simple, and you still get good quality audio recordings. For example, the Nady CM-88 is typically on the cheaper end of the under $50 range, and that’s good news for a newbie engineer with a tight budget.

But like I said in the previous section, a lot of these mics are some-trick ponies — such is the case the the CM-88. It’s built mainly for recording drums as an overhead mic, for any type of cymbal, or even for a snare drum. It can record a loud instruments well — that’s its best trick. But, if you’re new to recording drums and don’t have a ton of money, this mic would be one very good option to consider.

Conclusion

Just because someone is an underdog, it doesn’t mean they always suck. This is also true for microphones under $50. Yes, that’s very cheap. But if you need to record a specific instrument and you’re on a budget, you can find a mic that fits your needs for a price that fits your bank account.

You do have to be careful in your choice so you make sure you get the best mic available. But that’s why we wrote you this review — to make it easier on you.

HOW IT WORKS

The appropriate research can do wonders if done properly. We are here to help you and save your time and money at the same time. In our website you will see our personal recommendations based on our knowledge and extensive research. What we base our rating using the product details and customer feedback.